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C. W. Mertz House

ORIGINALLY BUILT CIRCA 1905

Renderings

AN ELEGANT BALCONY. A GRAND VERANDA

Artist Renditions – Actual Finish May Vary.

Specifications

Summary

Charming two-story Queen Anne style Victorian house that will be fully refurbished, refreshed and repurposed by skilled craftsmen to suit the needs of any retail, restaurant or service oriented business.

An ideal setting for a restaurant, cafe, wine bistro, boutique, retail shop, specialty store, salon, spa, gallery or any other enterprise which would thrive in an interesting and inviting environment.

Details
  • 2 Story
  • TBD Square Feet
  • Hardwood Floors
  • TBD # of Baths
  • New Plumbing
  • New Electrical
  • Pier and Beam Foundation
  • HVAC – All Electric

Floor Plans

First Floor

The Pink Lady

Placeholder – Actual Floor Plans coming soon.

Second Floor

The Pink Lady

Placeholder – Actual Floor Plans coming soon.

History

Built in 1904 by C.W. Mertz

Once inhabited by the family of C.W. Mertz, a prominent Cleburne banker, real estate entrepreneur, insurance broker and civic leader in the early 1900s, this six-bedroom home originally stood 730 North Main Street in Cleburne, Texas. It was saved from demolition by Stephen Hidlebaugh of Founders Row in Midlothian after the city condemned it in 2016. The costs to bring the house back up to city code was too much for the owner who had been living there for more than 50 years so she decided to sell it to avoid having to bulldoze the house and incur the fees involved. She was just happy to be able to save it.

A Rich History

This house fits in with the late 1800s, early 1900s architecture of there Founders Row streetscape. The house also has a lot of original features the developers were looking for. The home was built between 1904-07 by C.W. Mertz, who arrived in Cleburne in 1881 or 1882 from Paris, Texas, where he had organized a Farmers and Merchant Bank that later became the First National Bank of Cleburne in 1889. Historic buildings like the Mertz House are a valuable resource that make a city unique. When preserved properly, they remain relevant in the future and history is preserved for future generations.